93 Points- Jeb Dunnuck

90 Points- Vinous 

90  Points - Robert Parker Wine Advocate

REVIEWS

Showing the quality of this vintage, the 2016 HG III is a big, opulent, incredibly sexy effort that boasts a deep purple color and terrific notes of black cherries, chocolate, dried flowers, and spice. Made from Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and Petite Sirah (that’s the III of HG III), it’s one heck of a red blend and well worth seeking out.
--Jeb Dunnuck


The 2016 HG III is fresh, floral and fruity, all qualities that make it an excellent choice for drinking now and over the next few years. Dark red cherry, flowers and sweet spice are nicely pushed forward in this aromatic, silky, mid-weight offering from Hourglass.
--Vinous


Medium to deep garnet-purple colored, the 2015 Proprietary Red Hourglass H. G. III (a Merlot-heavy blend) has lovely spiced plums and kirsch scents with underlying notes of vanilla pod, chocolate and cinnamon stick. Medium to full-bodied, it gives appealing, pure black fruit flavors, with soft and plush tannins paving the long, spicy finish.
--Robert Parker Wine Advocate

**Ready to ship January 15th

WHY WE LOVE IT
  • BLEND
    Bordeaux Blend
  • APPELLATION
    Napa Valley
  • ALCOHOL
    13.50%
  • SIZE
    750ml
  • FRUIT

  • BODY

  • OAK

  • ACIDITY

Making wine of great personality is not like making Coca-Cola or Budweiser (two things I quite enjoy). Formulas are the realm of consistency, but not of artistry. Chasing the Holy Grail of wine is an art form: ephemeral, complex and ever-evolving. No doubt, the understanding of how we apply our craft will continue to evolve,prodded along by new discoveries and new dimensions of knowledge. Through science and experience, we will see deeper into this complex chemical web that is wine, comprehending new relationships and developing new tools of artistic expression. This vision unfolding does not end here, as quite possibly our best wines have yet to be made.
--Jeff Smith, Hourglass Founder

TASTING NOTES 

The 2015 HG III follows the characteristics of the vintage with its rich opulence. Approachable at the pull of the cork, explosive aromas of black cherry, blackberries and Hoisin mingle with elevated notes of roasted hazelnut and cedar for a seductive perfume. The sensation of blackberry jam, ripe plum and cola nut carry forward on the palate with a mouth coating depth and trailing finish. Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and a cadre of Italian Mixed Blacks represent the “III” of HG III: Merlot for a sleek and supple mid-palate, Cabernet for core structure and extended finish, and a secret sauce from the Mixed Blacks for depth and layering. An unmistakable hint of dark chocolate yields a richness that complements the pure black fruit character, while the mouthfeel is decidedly lush. The blend finishes strong with expansive, lingering notes.

THE STORY TO KNOW

Hourglass is two vineyards, a winery and a compilation of estate wines:
a vision unfolding. 

The idea of Hourglass was born from a place, yet ultimately would become a journey of human discovery. The interplay of terroir and artistic intention yields wines of unique personality that possess an intriguing dialectic: rich with layers of concentration yet vibrant with a tensional edge; classically structured yet silky in texture; unquestionably modern but with traditional stripes. 

Tony Biagi is a postmodernist, in life and how he applies his craft as a winemaker. Among his many unique talents is his ability to synthesize traditional techniques with cutting-edge theory—a classicist/modernist yin and yang. He approaches winemaking as an artist informed by science, accepting there is certain alchemy in winemaking that may never be fully understood.

Jeff continues by pointing out: We’re in a refinement phase of what we started some 20 years ago. Our objective is to farm to very precise moments when grape chemistry is in balance. The goal is not to chase some mythical ideal of a vineyard’s ‘ultimate expression of terroir,’ as if that occurs magically. The objective is to find our ultimate expression of that vineyard. Terroir is real, but it’s subject to interpretation. We drive to find a balancing point where the vineyard delivers the dialectic puzzle pieces we are looking for. If we get that right, Tony has what he needs to work his magic.