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91+pts, Wine Spectator
Medium garnet-purple colored, the 2012 Olmo's Reward, a blend of Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon and a little Petit Verdot, has aromas of red currants, cranberries and blackberries with nuances of cedar, cloves and beef drippings. Medium-bodied and delicately constructed on the palate, firm, finely grained tannins and racy backbone, finishing long and savory.

95pts Jeremy Oliver - Australian Wine Annual

WHY WE LOVE IT
  • BLEND
    Bordeaux Blend
  • APPELLATION
    Frankland River
  • ALCOHOL
    14.50%
  • SIZE
    750ml

Tucked away in the beautiful, rugged landscape of the not-so-well-known Frankland River Region of Southwestern Australia, sits the Frankland Estate. It takes about 4 hours to get to from just about anywhere more densely populated (think Perth), but is its own slice of farming heaven. The owners, Barrie Smith and Judi Cullam, were originally wool farmers and decided in the late 80s to diversify their landscape and plant 30 hectares to vineyards. With a mind focused on organic farming they use mid-row cultivation, mulching, composting, and other techniques to increase soil fertility and bio-diversity in the vineyard. They even have a flock of guinea fowl led by Gladys, the queen hen, to tend to the bugs in the vineyard!

Ok, so geeky history and organic practices aside, let’s get to this Olmo’s Reward. A blend of predominantly Cab Franc, Merlot and a smidge of Malbec, this beautifully balanced and complex wine has stunning aromas and flavors of juicy blue fruits, currants, and cranberries with notes of cedar, Thanksgiving spice and a hint of classic minty eucalyptus found in Aussie wines. It’s not your typical big, heavy Australian wine, it’s refined, savory and has a lovely racy backbone thanks to the vibrant acidity.

Oh and the name you ask? It’s named for the founder of the region, UC Davis professor and renowned American viticulturist, Dr. Harold Olmo. He realized the region’s wine-growing potential in 1954, drawing similarities between its cool climate influence from the Frankland River to that of Bordeaux. We think he deserves the kudos.

Wine Spectator gives it 91+pts and provides a colorful descriptor of it showing notes of ""red currants, cranberries and blackberries with nuances of cedar, cloves and beef drippings. Medium-bodied and delicately constructed on the palate, firm, finely grained tannins and racy backbone, finishing long and savory.”

Yes indeed, we’re a fan and we think you should be too! Especially since this is coming from a corner of the world you may not encounter all that frequently.

TASTING NOTES 

Refined and savory, this blend of Cab Franc, Merlot and Malbec shows aromas and flavors of juicy blue fruits, currants, and cranberries with notes of cedar, Thanksgiving spice and a hint of minty eucalyptus. Medium-bodied, racy acidity, and fine tannins.

THE STORY TO KNOW

Buried deep in the heart of Western Australia’s most isolated wine region, Frankland Estate is as much apart of its natural landscape as it is a winery.

Located 250km east of Margaret River and inland from the wild and picturesque Great Southern coastline, they take their role as custodians of the land very seriously. They have invested a lot of time and energy into minimising their impact on the ecological balance of the region, nuturing the micro-biology of the soils and supporting causes to improve the health and future prosperity of the local fauna and flora.

Before founding the estate in 1988, they embarked on a tour of French vineyards, and worked two vintages at Bordeaux’s renowned Chateau Senejac, in the Haut-Medoc region. Armed with a wealth of knowledge from their French experience and a shared passion for wine, they decided to diversify their farming interests from wool growing to wine by establishing vineyards on Isolation Ridge, a very special location on the property, which has shown all the hallmarks of a great vineyard they came to know through their travels and viticultural studies.

Their commitment to sustainable farming is what informs their winemaking practices. They have learned many hard-lessons and honed their skills over 29 vintages on their home vineyards. The consistency of depth, complexity and intensity of flavour in their wines has reinforced their belief in this approach, and amplified their respect for their extraordinary natural environment.